Category Archives: digital history

Making the TCP texts accessible, part 3: An Index

I have previously posted about the vast collection of early printed texts released by the Text Creation Partnership. To recap: the TCP have released vast numbers of early modern, eighteenth century texts. But they are not easily discoverable or downloadable. … Continue reading

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Making the TCP texts accessible, part 2 [Updated]

Nearly five years ago, I uploaded over two thousand eighteenth century works in plain text from ECCO (Eighteenth Century Collection Online) to the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Datahub. Unfortunately, in a recent server migration, the texts disappeared from that repository; I … Continue reading

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Radical Hackney after World War One

Spurred on by the great Radical Hackney History blog, I’ve dug out some digital press clippings on radical movements in my home borough after the first world war. The first covers an early instance of squatting, when unemployed workers unoccupied … Continue reading

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Digital Humanities GIS projects revisited

A milestone: my list of Digital Humanities GIS projects has now topped 100 entries. It currently stands at 103 entries, the latest to be added being the Google-sponsored Routes of Sefarad, mapping Jewish Heritage in Spain, and Placing Literature, an … Continue reading

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Locating London’s Pasts

Last week I attended a seminar on the latest venture from Sheffield and Hertfordshire Universities’ family of digital history projects, Locating London’s Past. The aim is to create a sort of geographical front end to a number of London-centred datasets, … Continue reading

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Making the TCP-ECCO texts accessible

In April, the Text Creation Partnership released into the public domain over 2,000 eighteenth century works,  in plain text. You can read more about this project and the texts on their blog: TCP Releases Over 4,000 New EEBO-TCP Texts What the … Continue reading

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Victorian Books: The Frequency of Revolution

Opened to the public late last year was the long awaited Victorian Books, ‘a Distant Reading of Victorian Publications.’ Working with data from Google Books,  Dan Cohen and Fred Gibbs are text mining every book published in Britain in the … Continue reading

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The Return of History Workshop

For some time I’ve been considering writing a post entitled “Whatever Happened to History Workshop?” Once it was the flag-bearer of radical history, a product of the struggles of the 60s and 70s, as much a movement as a publication. … Continue reading

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DH 2010, day four

For me, the final day was the important one, with both the geography and history sessions taking place. The former saw three excellent presentations, from the University of North Carolina, Ian Gregory and the Hestia project. But the big news … Continue reading

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London Lives, Plebian Lives

A few weeks ago I went to a presentation of the London Lives project, held by the Long 18th Century seminar at the IHR. This ambitious undertaking aims to integrate the records of some of London’s major organizations – among … Continue reading

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